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  1. This website is Dedicated to Educating Caregivers about the Physical, Emotional, Psychological, Intellectual and Nutritional Needs of the Parrots in their Lives. 

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SALLY'S WILD BIRD BOOK REVIEWS
 Sally Blanchard's Book Sales, Tongue-in-Beak Clayworks, Color Pencil Drawings, Parrot and Bird Collectibles

Avian Architecture
by Peter Goodfellow
The Atlas of Birds Diversity, Behavior, and Conservation
by Mike Unwin

Birds of Aruba, Curacao, and Bonaire
by Bart de Boer, Eric Newton, and Robin Restall

Birds of Hawaii, New Zealand, and the Central and West Pacific
by Ber Van Perlo

The Birds of New Jersey
by William J. Boyle Jr.

Cotingas and Manakins
by Guy M. Kirwin and Graeme Green

Hawks at a Distance
by Jerry Liguori

Petrels, Albatrosses & Storm Petrels of North America
by Steve N. G. Howell

 
 
 
Avian Architecture
How Birds Design, Engineer & Build

by Peter Goodfellow


The courtship and breeding behavior of bird species can be immensely varied as is the creativity that they use in providing an arena for their courtship and a home for their babies.The male bower birds of Australasia build incredible structures decorated with shiny colorful accents to attract females. These used to be mostly flower petals and other objects from nature but now some bower birds that live near humans will use the colorful discards of those people. Avian Architecture describes the sometimes simple and sometimes incredibly complex structures that birds build to attract mates, as nests, and for food storage. The Adelie Penguin builds a simple bed of stones as a nest but have to be extremely vigilant so that other Adelie Penguins don't steal their rocks for their own nests. The brush turkey of  Australia builds a layered mound of vegetation. The eggs are laid in this mound and the rotting vegetation acts as an incubator. Once the precocial chicks hatch they climb out of the mound and are on their own without any need for parenting. Birds use many different materials to build their nests including sticks, mud, leaves, spider webs, flowers, and even saliva. Some birds stitch leaves together with grasses, while others build complex apartment structures that can house hundreds of birds. As a bird lover, I found this to be very readable and with the illustrations and photographs it makes the process of avian architecture easy to understand. From the time I first started studying birds, I have been fascinated by how unique the individual species are in so many aspects of their lives. This is clearly shown by their Avian Architecture.   
 
The Atlas of Birds: Diversity, Behavior, and Conservation
by Mike Unwin

Princeton University Press 2011

In my collection of bird books, I have several books with a title similar to The Atlas of Birds. This one is quite a bit different. Although it may not be as extensive as far as photographs in some of the other books with the term "Atlas" in their name, I like the way that this book is arranged and the fact that it provides very interesting aspects of the study of birds. It is divided into eight parts. These include a basic introduction, where birds live and how their habitat influences their biology and behavior, how birds are related to each other, how they live, how people influence their lives, threats to birds, how we are attempting to protect them and ends with a statistical table that shows the human and bird populations of the world's countries and other important information. For example, Brazil 1,712 bird species with 12% of them being endemic; out of those species, 123 are threatened.
 
Birds of Aruba, Curacao, and Bonaire
by Bart de Boer, Eric Newton, and Robin Restall

These three islands off the coast of Venezuela are close enough to the states that they are a wonderful bird watching destination. Some of the birds on the islands are our bird friends here who spend their winters there. While others are Caribbean/South American gems like the Ruby-topaz hummingbird, the Bananaquit, and the Venezuelan Troupial. There are 10 parrots found on the islands and all but 2 are introduced. The native parrot family birds are the yellow-shouldered Amazon and the brown-throated parakeet or conure. There is some thought that the presence of the green-rumped parrotlet, which was believed to consist of escaped cage birds may actually be birds that migrate from the mainland. The yellow-shouldered Amazon breeds on Bonaire but is now considered to be extirpated (locally extinct) on Aruba, Birds on Curacao may have been "blown" over from Bonaire or if they are escaped cage birds.
 
Birds of Hawaii, New Zealand, and the Central and West Pacific
by Ber van Perlo


Coming
 

The Birds of New Jersey
Author: William J. Boyle, Jr.
Photographic Editor: Kevin Y. Karlson
Published: May, 2011 Princeton University Press
308 pages – 200 photographs and Distribution Maps
ISBN-10: 0691144109 - ISBN-13: 978-0691144108
Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 0.9 inches

When I went to high school on Long Island, our senior class trip was to a dude ranch in New Jersey.  Over the years a lot of people have thought that was hysterical. We all have some misconceptions about places that we have never been. I think too many people think of New Jersey as being a cement jungle. I have been to this state several times in the last twenty years to give programs about parrots and for those who still have this concept that New Jersey is a totally citified state, the truth is far different. There is a great deal of wild bird habitat, including rivers, swamps, farm lands, coastlines, and forested areas. The Pine Barrens (think Jersey Devil) are home to 300+ birds and Cape May is a famous and well-visited destination for migrating songbirds and the people who want to see them.  Cape May is also the place where bird watchers are more likely to see rare migrants than anywhere else in the state.  While New Jersey does have a large population, few of the people bear any similarity to those caricatures from the Jersey Shore “reality” TV show.  In fact, with a few glaring exceptions, I have found the people I have met from New Jersey to be generous of spirit and people who really love their parrots.

So the point of this is a new book by William J. Boyle The Birds of New Jersey: Status and Distribution published by the Princeton University Press. While not all of the birds are represented by photographs, almost half of them are with 200 color photographs. This is a valuable bird book for bird watchers who are visiting New Jersey and want to know what they are likely to see where. Residents can also determine what bird is in their area and when it is likely to be there. I didn't realize that the range of the Carolina chickadee is limited to about two thirds of the southern part of the state and the Black-capped chickadee occurs in the northern third. There is some overlap but the range of both birds is pretty well defined. It is also a good book for someone who is convinced that they might have gotten a glimpse of a totally out of range Vermillion Flycatcher but all of their friends think they’re nuts that they don’t know a Scarlet Tanager when they see one.

 
Cotingas and Manikins
by Guy M. Kirwin and Graeme Green


I have studied birds for many years and started being fascinated with North American birds.Then I was fascinated with parrots, which led me to a fascination with the birds of the world. When I started studying the bird families of the world, I couldn't belief the incredible variety of behaviors and habitats. On a trip to Costa Rica, I was able to observe birds that I knew very little about. One of the birds I fell in love with was the long-tailed manikin. During breeding season two adult males will get together to display. They may be joined by an immature bird. The alpha male dances around a stick or low branch.  He is accompanied by the other males, but it is the alpha male that will win the watching hen if his dance attracts her. While we didn't see the actual performance, our bird guide pointed out a small twig sticking out of the ground. There was a circle in the dirt that showed the path of the tail of the dancing bird.

We often think of the Birds of Paradise from Australasia when we think of fancy feathers and intricate displays, but the Cotingas and Manikins come awfully close to them and some of the bird may even exceed them in their unusual appearance and behavior. The Cock of the Rock is one of the best-known Cotingas with its fancy headdress. Perhaps you have seen the "moon walking" display behavior of the red-capped manikin. I believe you can still find it on You Tube. The feather color and display feathers in the birds of these families have a tremendous variety; some are plain, some are very colorful and some are bizarre. The long-wattled umbrella bird makes up for his lack of color with some of the most unique feather configurations on any bird. The umbrella crest almost covers the bill and a full wattle will hang down past the perch he us standing on.

The Cotingas and Manikins are a fascinating group of Central and South American birds and this is a stunning book with in-depth information about each bird in these families
.
 
Hawks at a Distance
by Jerry Liguori


Coming
 
 Petrels, Albatrosses & Storm Petrels of North America
by Steve N. G. Howell


Coming
 
 
 
 
 
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